“Affordable new Skoda EV could be a genuine game changer”

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Mike Rutherford thinks Skoda’s future EV plans are a huge positive for the car industry.

I fear that in the final week of April, our much-loved world of motor cars, motorists, motoring and manufacturing went ever so slightly mad.

But bonkers doesn’t necessarily mean bad. And Skoda proved this by doing what some of its rivals might consider insane: actually telling the truth (we hope); doing away with the usual motor industry BS; keeping consumer matters simple; acknowledging the necessity for affordable EVs; giving appropriate assurances to current and future customers.

From its global HQ in the Czech Republic, the company even put everything in writing so its strictly on-the-record promises can be challenged if they’re not delivered in future. That’s either mad or very clever. The latter, I reckon.

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Examples of Skoda’s deliverables (touch wood) that are now cast in stone? Some of its “by 2026” 100 per cent-electric cars are being formally described simply as “Small”, “Compact”, “Estate” or “Space (seven-seater).”

And continuing the straight talking: “The future-entry model bearing the working title ‘Small’ will be around 4.1 metres long, priced around 25,000 Euros (AUD$41,000) and produced at a VW Group plant.”

Put another way, it’ll be a proper pure-electric car that’s around the same size as Skoda’s Fabia – yet for not much more. Skoda’s “Small” offering could mark the arrival proper of the well-packaged, high-quality, affordable EV. It’s destined to be a genuine game changer – possibly the most significant ever for potential pure-EV buyers on tight budgets. Which is the vast majority of us.

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