Cadillac reveals Lyriq electric SUV

Cadillac’s first electric vehicle has been revealed, a 480km-plus SUV that will launch in 2022.

Cadillac has detailed its first electric production model, the Lyriq, in concept form ahead of the SUV’s launch.

The Lyriq (the first car to use the American premium brand’s new naming strategy of taking a ‘q’ suffix) is based on a newly developed EV architecture that’s expected to be used elsewhere in the range in due course.

The exterior look showcases new design elements, such as a distinctive blacked-out grille with LED lighting elements, new vertically mounted headlights and tail-lights and a steeply raked rear screen.

The Lyriq’s door handles sit flush with the bodywork and pop out at the touch of a button. It’s not clear how much of this will make production.

The biggest aesthetic change over current Cadillacs is found inside, with a 33-inch-wide combination of digital instrument display and infotainment screen stretching across the dashboard. There’s also an augmented-reality head-up display.

The Lyriq will be offered with two drivetrain configurations when it launches in two years time: rear-wheel drive and ‘performance’ four-wheel drive.

Using a new modular battery technology, Cadillac claims a driving range of more than 480km under the US’s strict EPA testing procedure. It would likely be longer if testing under the WLTP regime.

The Lyriq is capable of DC rapid-charging at up to 150kW. Cadillac claims it features a centre of gravity around 3.9-inch lower than that of the similar-size XT5 SUV, while 50:50 front-to-rear weight distribution on the 4WD version means handling prowess is promised.

Lawrence Allan

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