Rolls-Royce Wraith shooting brake revealed

Niels van Roij Design will build just seven rebodied Wraiths, each with its own unique finish.

Dutch coachbuilder Niels van Roij Design has turned its hand to the Rolls-Royce Wraith to create an ultra-exclusive shooting brake inspired by 1930s grand tourers.

The firm, best known for its Range Rover-based Adventum two-door SUV and Tesla Model S estate, will build just seven examples of the Silver Spectre Shooting Brake, each of which will be finished in a bespoke theme inside and out.

From the front, the Silver Spectre resembles the Rolls-Royce on which it is based, but a side view shows how the roofline has been extended towards the rear, while the original car’s conventional boot lid has made way for a hatchback-style upright tailgate.

The new roof panel has been formed from carbonfibre – one of the largest single pieces available, claims the firm – to allow for its unique silhouette, while the tailgate protrudes slightly from the main body of the car in homage to “vintage and stately Anglian limousines of the 1950s and 1960s”.

The Silver Spectre takes its power from the BMW-derived 6.6-litre V12 as found in the Wraith, which has been uprated to provide 515kW – up from 465kW – and 900Nm of torque.

Available options include two-tone exterior finishes, hand-applied pinstripes, embroidered headrests, polished wood interior trim, personalised tread plates and colour-coded leather or silk upholstery.

A ‘starlight headliner’ made of fibre-optic strands is said to be “a true statement and showcase of the bespoke capabilities”. The lights fade away towards the rear of the car to give a realistic impression of a starlit sky.

The enlarged boot area is upholstered in padded leather to match the cabin. The company said this is “an uncommon sight” because boot spaces are usually “rectilinear and carpeted, apparently forgotten design elements”.

Designer and company founder Niels van Roij said: “With this dramatically styled vehicle we subtly link back to the hay days of shooting brakes in the 1930s, whilst embedding the iconic, soft and creamy visual cues from classic British automotive icons – all without being constrained by these motorcars in the execution of the modern styling. The outcome is not only a highly original design, but also a historically relevant car.”

Felix Page

Jaguar E-Type at 60: return to the Jabbeke Highway

We take an F-Type to the Belgian motorway where Jaguar made its name as a sports car maker to consider its past and future. What...

Opinion: ‘Less electric car hype and fewer broken promises’

Mi.ke Rutherford thinks realism is key to sustaining the growth of electric cars. It's 10 years, almost to the day, since I first drove the...

Exclusive: Meet the designer of the Ineos Grenadier

The Defender-inspired Grenadier is the work of award-winning designer Toby Ecuyer, but this is his first car. Toby Ecuyer, designer of the new Ineos Grenadier...

Related articles